Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety

Presented by:

Paul Aiken

Steven Aiken

Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety

Bicycle and Pedestrian Safety

It is critical to understand bicycle and pedestrian safety. Riding a bicycle in Massachusetts is a popular and fun mode of transportation, as well as a terrific form of exercise, but it comes with the responsibility of practicing bicycle safety. Due to factors like distracted drivers and poorly lit roadways, auto-bicycle accidents happen every day throughout Massachusetts. Bicyclists are extremely vulnerable, so many of these accidents can result in catastrophic personal injury and sometimes wrongful death. READ MORE at BeSafeRules.com

General Bicycle Laws in Massachusetts:

  • Bicyclists must ride with the flow of motor vehicle traffic;
     (however, pedestrians must always walk against the flow of traffic)
  • The cyclist operator shall keep at least one hand upon the handlebars at all times;
  • When bikers are riding together they shall not ride more than 2 abreast but, on a roadway with more
    than 1 lane in the direction of travel, cyclists shall ride within a single lane with the flow of motor vehicle traffic;
  • Bicycles may be ridden on sidewalks outside business districts when necessary in the interest of safety unless otherwise directed by local ordinance;
  • Any person under the age of 16 riding a bicycle, as an operator or passenger, must wear a protective bicycle helmet.

Both bicyclists and motorists should be educated on all of the Massachusetts Bicycle Laws.

Bicycle Safety Tips

Always wear a helmet and bright, light or reflective clothing

Know and use proper hand signals

Keep Tires inflated properly

Have brakes and gears tuned regularly

Ensure front and back lamps and pedal reflectors are working

Ride defensively (assume motor vehicles cannot see you)

If you’ve been involved or injured in a bicycle or pedestrian accident, contact Steven or Paul Aiken at the Law Offices of Aiken & Aiken, P.C. in Hyannis for a Free Consultation.

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